Percentage Problem Solving Questions

Percentage Problem Solving Questions-7
If 15% of the total votes were declared invalid and the total numbers of votes is 560000, find the number of valid vote polled in favour of candidate.Solution: Total number of invalid votes = 15 % of 560000 = 15/100 × 560000 = 8400000/100 = 84000Total number of valid votes 560000 – 84000 = 476000 Percentage of votes polled in favour of candidate A = 75 % Therefore, the number of valid votes polled in favour of candidate A = 75 % of 476000 = 75/100 × 476000= 35700000/100 = 357000 2. He found 15% of oranges and 8% of bananas were rotten. Solution: Total number of fruits shopkeeper bought = 600 400 = 1000 Number of rotten oranges = 15% of 600 = 15/100 × 600 = 9000/100 = 90Number of rotten bananas = 8% of 400 = 8/100 × 400 = 3200/100 = 32Therefore, total number of rotten fruits = 90 32 = 122 Therefore Number of fruits in good condition = 1000 - 122 = 878 Therefore Percentage of fruits in good condition = (878/1000 × 100)% = (87800/1000)% = 87.8% 3. Money he spent = 30 % of m = 30/100 × m = 3/10 m Money left with him = m – 3/10 m = (10m – 3m)/10 = 7m/10 But money left with him = $ 2100 Therefore 7m/10 = $ 2100 m = $ 2100× 10/7 m = $ 21000/7m = $ 3000 Therefore, the money he took for shopping is $ 3000.

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You probably put the amount (18) over 100 in the proportion, rather than the percent (125).

Perhaps you thought 18 was the percent and 125 was the base.

Since we have a percent of change that is bigger than 1 we know that we have an increase.

To find out how big of an increase we've got we subtract 1 from 1.6.

$$\frac=\frac$$ $$\frac\cdot =\frac\cdot b$$ $$a=\frac\cdot b$$ x/100 is called the rate.

$$a=r\cdot b\Rightarrow Percent=Rate\cdot Base$$ Where the base is the original value and the percentage is the new value.Jeff wonders how much money the coupon will take off the original 0 price.In a percent problem, the base represents how much should be considered 100% (the whole); in exponents, the base is the value that is raised to a power when a number is written in exponential notation. Since the percent is the percent off, the amount will be the amount off of the price.If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.and *.are unblocked.We begin by subtracting the smaller number (the old value) from the greater number (the new value) to find the amount of change.$0-150=90$$ Then we find out how many percent this change corresponds to when compared to the original number of students $$a=r\cdot b$$ $=r\cdot 150$$ $$\frac=r$$ $[[

$$a=r\cdot b\Rightarrow Percent=Rate\cdot Base$$ Where the base is the original value and the percentage is the new value.

Jeff wonders how much money the coupon will take off the original $220 price.

In a percent problem, the base represents how much should be considered 100% (the whole); in exponents, the base is the value that is raised to a power when a number is written in exponential notation. Since the percent is the percent off, the amount will be the amount off of the price.

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$$a=r\cdot b\Rightarrow Percent=Rate\cdot Base$$ Where the base is the original value and the percentage is the new value.Jeff wonders how much money the coupon will take off the original $220 price.In a percent problem, the base represents how much should be considered 100% (the whole); in exponents, the base is the value that is raised to a power when a number is written in exponential notation. Since the percent is the percent off, the amount will be the amount off of the price.If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.and *.are unblocked.We begin by subtracting the smaller number (the old value) from the greater number (the new value) to find the amount of change.$$240-150=90$$ Then we find out how many percent this change corresponds to when compared to the original number of students $$a=r\cdot b$$ $$90=r\cdot 150$$ $$\frac=r$$ $$0.6=r= 60\%$$ We begin by finding the ratio between the old value (the original value) and the new value $$percent\:of\:change=\frac=\frac=1.6$$ As you might remember 100% = 1.Look at the pairs of multiplication and division facts below, and look for a pattern in each row.Percent problems can also be solved by writing a proportion.Aaron had $ 2100 left after spending 30 % of the money he took for shopping. Fraction into Percentage Percentage into Fraction Percentage into Ratio Ratio into Percentage Percentage into Decimal Decimal into Percentage Percentage of the given Quantity How much Percentage One Quantity is of Another?To solve problems with percent we use the percent proportion shown in "Proportions and percent".

]].6=r= 60\%$$ We begin by finding the ratio between the old value (the original value) and the new value $$percent\:of\:change=\frac=\frac=1.6$$ As you might remember 100% = 1.Look at the pairs of multiplication and division facts below, and look for a pattern in each row.Percent problems can also be solved by writing a proportion.Aaron had $ 2100 left after spending 30 % of the money he took for shopping. Fraction into Percentage Percentage into Fraction Percentage into Ratio Ratio into Percentage Percentage into Decimal Decimal into Percentage Percentage of the given Quantity How much Percentage One Quantity is of Another?To solve problems with percent we use the percent proportion shown in "Proportions and percent".

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