Crash Movie Analysis Essay

Crash Movie Analysis Essay-42
is a drama film produced in the United States that premiered at the Toronto International Festival on September 10, 2004.The film’s main theme is racial and ethnic stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination—all of which are still present in modern American society.

is a drama film produced in the United States that premiered at the Toronto International Festival on September 10, 2004.The film’s main theme is racial and ethnic stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination—all of which are still present in modern American society.

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Therefore, it just shows that even though we try to not be racist or follow stereotypes, we still catch ourselves doing it. I think that identity and perception are related because everyday we are consistently changing our identity physically, emotionally, and mentally.

We experience different situations throughout the day that help shape our identity and change how we think or perceive things.

It is worth noting that, for most of the film, the viewer is kept in suspense and strained as the characters communicate with each other with trepidation, and at times even aggression and direct violence.

The actors have successfully managed to depict their characters’ inner conflicts and struggles with their personal beliefs, as well as, social stigmas.

By the end of the film, it is hard to classify any character as explicitly bad, even though there has been a lot of racism and anger expressed by some of the characters.

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The reason for that is because the storyline puts the characters in the kind of situations where they have to decide whether they dare to trust their intuition, in spite of some stereotypes and fears they consciously or unconsciously have, and risk their lives believing in the innate goodness of people.For example, I was particularly struck by the story of a young police officer, played by Ryan Phillippe, who first comes across as a positive character, disgusted by the racist beliefs of his older companion.On his way home from work, the officer picks up a hitchhiker, and they start a friendly conversation, albeit with a hint of tension.The bitter irony of the whole situation is that later, ashamed by his own cowardly and indecent act, the officer does an even more terrible deed—he dumps the body of the poor teen into a roadside ditch and drives away.What I found particularly effective about is the element of ambiguity in every character in the film, even the racist and cruel older police officer played by Matt Dillon, who courageously saves the life of the woman he humiliated the night before.The film was produced and directed by Paul Haggis, and is based on a personal biographical experience of the director being carjacked outside a video store in 1991.The film takes place in Los Angeles, where eight different stories are developed over a two-day period.Even though some viewers might find it hard at first to quickly switch from one story to the other, such an approach to storytelling in my opinion is completely justified.The director obviously did a great job combining the stories in a natural and realistic manner.However, the officer is far from being free of prejudice himself and when put into a particularly stressful situation and suspecting the African-American teenager to be a gang member and a threat to his life, this officer, unwilling to bear the risk, shoots the young man only because the latter could have presented a danger to him.The young man, in fact, was harmless in that situation and did not present any threat to the officer whatsoever.

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